My perfunctory attempt at a blog, let's see what happens, Oh God save the Children, Look away, It'll all be alright, I promise...

asylum-art:

The Disturbing Sculptures of Dongwook

" Love Me Sweet"Arrario Gallery Seoul  samcheong, Korea 2012

Dongwook Lee’s works focus on the contradictions that are fundamentally inherent in human existence and life. Exquisitely hyper-realistic and surrealistically imagined renditions of his miniature human figures are staged in absurd situations in Lee’s works, in which the bleak everyday life transforms into poetic horror. In Lee’s work, a fragile warrior is wearing his own flesh as his armor, and the naked child stands with innocent face in front of blood-stained killing (which he might have committed). His oeuvre stands at an odd intersection of life and death, beauty and cruelty, civilization and wild, and reality and fantasy, unfolding a world of fantasy where people are severed from reality.

ancientart:

A stag-shaped Parthian drinking horn. 1 of about 4 similar horns currently on view at the Getty, I believe. 
Made of silver, gold, glass, and garnet, this stunning drinking vessel dates from 50 BC- AD 50.

The forepart of a stag emerges from the curving body of this gilt silver rhyton. The stag is very naturalistic and highly detailed, down to the rendering of veins in the snout. The wide inlaid eyes and the outstretched legs heighten the realism as the stag seemingly bolts in flight. The term rhyton comes from the Greek verb meaning “to run through,” and depictions of rhyta on Greek vases show that they were used to aerate wine. Wine poured into the top of the vessel came out of a spout between the animal’s legs. The spout on this example is now missing, but the hole remains visible.
Stylistic features suggest that this rhyton was made in northwest Iran in the period from 50 B.C. to A.D. 50. This region had been part of the Achaemenid Persian Empire until Alexander the Great’s conquest. After his death in 323 B.C., the Hellenistic Greek Seleucid dynasty, whose kingdom stretched from Turkey to Afghanistan, ruled this area. As Seleucid authority began to weaken In the later 200s B.C., a group of semi-nomadic people called the Parthians, from the steppes of south central Asia, challenged the dynasty and by the mid-100s B.C. had firm control of this area of Iran. This complicated political history left its legacy in the art of the area. Rhyta of this form had a long history in earlier art of Iran, but the floral motifs were drawn from Seleucid art. (getty)

Courtesy of & currently located at The J. Paul Getty Museum, Villa Collection, Malibu, California. Via their online collections: 86.AM.753.

ancientart:

A stag-shaped Parthian drinking horn. 1 of about 4 similar horns currently on view at the Getty, I believe. 

Made of silver, gold, glass, and garnet, this stunning drinking vessel dates from 50 BC- AD 50.

The forepart of a stag emerges from the curving body of this gilt silver rhyton. The stag is very naturalistic and highly detailed, down to the rendering of veins in the snout. The wide inlaid eyes and the outstretched legs heighten the realism as the stag seemingly bolts in flight. The term rhyton comes from the Greek verb meaning “to run through,” and depictions of rhyta on Greek vases show that they were used to aerate wine. Wine poured into the top of the vessel came out of a spout between the animal’s legs. The spout on this example is now missing, but the hole remains visible.

Stylistic features suggest that this rhyton was made in northwest Iran in the period from 50 B.C. to A.D. 50. This region had been part of the Achaemenid Persian Empire until Alexander the Great’s conquest. After his death in 323 B.C., the Hellenistic Greek Seleucid dynasty, whose kingdom stretched from Turkey to Afghanistan, ruled this area. As Seleucid authority began to weaken In the later 200s B.C., a group of semi-nomadic people called the Parthians, from the steppes of south central Asia, challenged the dynasty and by the mid-100s B.C. had firm control of this area of Iran. This complicated political history left its legacy in the art of the area. Rhyta of this form had a long history in earlier art of Iran, but the floral motifs were drawn from Seleucid art. (getty)

Courtesy of & currently located at The J. Paul Getty Museum, Villa Collection, Malibu, California. Via their online collections86.AM.753.

design-is-fine:

Joe Colombo, Multichair, 1970. Steel and polyurethane foam. Re-edition by B-Line, Italy.

“Monster" is derived from the Latin noun monstrum, "divine portent," itself formed on the root of the verb monere, "to warn." It came to refer to living things of anomalous shape or structure, or to fabulous creatures like the sphinx who were composed of strikingly incongruous parts, because the ancients considered the appearance of such beings to be a sign of some impending supernatural event. Monsters, like angels, functioned as messengers and heralds of the extraordinary. They served to announce impending revelation, saying, in effect, "Pay attention; something of profound importance is happening.”

– My Words to Victor Frankenstein: by Susan Stryker (via whatmonstrosity)

thehappysorceress:

jordangibson:

I hear you, Pete.

Aww…

thehappysorceress:

jordangibson:

I hear you, Pete.

Aww…

hoenn:

Ms. Marvel #7 by G. Willow Wilson, Jake Wyatt, & Ian Herring
homedesigning:

30 Unique Home Chess Sets

homedesigning:

30 Unique Home Chess Sets

choodraws:

find your way home

—-

a short comic i did for school, a little sloppy due to my deadline but i’m proud i got it done!

fangs-and-blood:

Metal Saber-toothed Tiger Skull Model. The fangs were coated with grass. Made by Xuande Copperwares

clayyount:

3 page comic about birds I did for PUMMEL.

funnywildlife:

mangofaster:

mgf

Greater blue eared glossy starling by Deemacphotos - Dave McHutchison

funnywildlife:

mangofaster:

mgf

Greater blue eared glossy starling by Deemacphotos - Dave McHutchison

dbvictoria:

UCSD surges into wearable tech market

UC San Diego’s Jacobs School of Engineering has been developing a telescopic contact lens that’s meant to help with a variety of eye problems, including age-related macular degeneration. Researchers say the center of the lens allows for normal, non-magnified vision. The telescope on the periphery of the lens magnifies images 2.8 times.

dbvictoria:

UCSD surges into wearable tech market

UC San Diego’s Jacobs School of Engineering has been developing a telescopic contact lens that’s meant to help with a variety of eye problems, including age-related macular degeneration. Researchers say the center of the lens allows for normal, non-magnified vision. The telescope on the periphery of the lens magnifies images 2.8 times.

howtoraiseageek:

boomerstarkiller67:

U.S.S. Enterprise miniature models - Star Trek: The Motion Picture (1979)

Lovely girl.

2headedsnake:

Light painting with drones

Ars Electronica Futurelab